Richard Carscadden 1840 – 1890

university of nebraskaRichard Carscadden 1840 – 1890 was an orthodox doctor who converted to homeopathy and graduated from the Hahnemann Medical College, and a President of the Homeopathic State Medical Society in Chicago and Vice-President of the Nebraska State Homeopathic Medical Association. He was Chair of Medicine at the State University of Nebraska, lecturing on the diseases of the heart and lungs. He was also a member of the York County Medical Society.

Richard Carscadden was a homeopathic physician and surgeon, was born in Canada, February 1, 1840, where he received his literary education, having attended the Albert College for sometime.

In 1863 he came to the United States and entered the Medical Department University of Michigan, and remained one year. Came to Chicago and studied in Prof. R. Dexter’s office as a private student for over a year.

In 1865 attended lectures in Rush Medical College, graduating in the class of 1866, after which he attended lectures in Hahnemann Medical College (homeopathic). He practiced as an old school physician for nearly three years, but since 1869 has been in the homeopathic practice.

In 1868 he removed to Sharon, Walworth County, Wis., at the end of five years located in De Pere, Brown County, Wis., where he resided when he came to Nebraska on account of failing health in the spring of 1879, and located at York, and has since practiced his profession, being the only physician of his school in the county, and Vice-President of the Nebraska State Homeopathic Medical Association.

He was married at Wheaton, Ill., in 1871, to Miss Clara A. Sedgwick. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church at York.

He became widely known, during his life, as a physician of marked ability, and enjoyed a valuable and ever increasing patronage. In politics he was a Prohibitionist and was an ardent and enthusiastic temperance worker, not only in his own city and county, but in many parts of the state.

deceased.–In the death of Dr. Carscadden, York county lost one of its most able and popular physicians as well as one of its earliest settlers. He was born at New Castle, in the Dominion of Canada, February 1, 1840, a son of Robert and Elizabeth (Freeborn) Carscadden. The father was of French and the mother of Scotch descent. The father was a farmer by occupation and reared a family of seven children, six sons and one daughter.

The Doctor received his preliminary training in the common schools of Canada, and also attended the Bellevue college. He then taught school in Canada for several years, and at the same time devoted himself to the study of medicine.

In 1861 he entered the medical department of the University of Michigan and attended there one year. He then entered the Rush Medical college, at Chicago, Illinois, and graduated from that institution in 1866. He began the practice of his profession at Blackberry, Kane county, Illinois, remaining there for three years.

He then moved to Sharon, Walworth county, Wisconsin, and made that his home for a short time.

In 1879 he moved to York, Nebraska, and continued his practice in that city until his death, which occurred July 21, 1890.

May 24, 1870, Dr. Carscadden was united in marriage to Miss Clara Sedgwick, a sister of S. H. Sedgwick, a sketch of whom will appear on another page of this volume. To this union have been born three children, whose names in the order of their birth are as follows: Ernestine P., Edna B., and Richard S., all of whom are now living.

Mrs. Carscadden was appointed by Governor Boyd, April 30, 1891, to the office of superintendent of State Industrial Training School for girls, and held that position until July, 1897.

The Doctor was also a graduate from the Chicago Homeopathic college, and was president of the Homeopathic State Medical Society for several years. He also filled the chair in the medical department of the State State University of Nebraska, teaching the treatment of the diseases of the heart, lungs, etc., for two years. He was also a member of the York County Medical Society.

He became widely known, during his life, as a physician of marked ability, and enjoyed a valuable and ever increasing patronage. In politics he was a Prohibitionist and was an ardent and enthusiastic temperance worker, not only in his own city and county, but in many parts of the state.

He was a member of the Knights of Pythias and some of the insurance fraternities, and was also a member of the Methodist church.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *