The Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital and Dispensary

Great Charles Street

The Birmingham Homeopathic Dispensary 1845 – 1859

A homeopathic dispensary was opened in Great Charles Street in 1845, and this was fully established by 1847,

Medical Officers: James Gibbs Blake, George Fearon, George Stevenson Knowles, Joseph Lawrence, William Parsons, Henry Robertson,

Treasurer: Henry Christian,

Honorary Secretary: Charles Corfield,

Chemist: Charles Corfield, William Headland (remedies by post),

1849560 patients were seen in June 1849,

1850John Mason Galloway joined the Dispensary, average annual patients seen 1760,

1858 the dispensary was funded entirely by sponsorship, fund raising, small weekly (or monthly) subscriptions, and donations from wills, notably £500 donated by Evelyn John Shirley MP of Ettington Park,

The Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital and Dispensary 1859 – 1875

Location 2, Upper Priory, Birmingham, and 11 Old Square, Birmingham,

1861 – the hospital issued The Report of the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital & Dispensary,

1863 – the hospital remains free from debt, with anual presentations to the dispensary approximately 2500 annually,prescriptions issued around 13,500 annually, with an annual income of £4-500, mainly fron donations from sponsors and subscribers (about 160),  and from paying patients, such that the hospital is approximately one third self funding, (the accounts of the Dispensary are here – submitted by Robert Martineau as a Patron of this dispensary),

1863the staff of the hospital were:

Medical Officers: James Gibbs Blake, Henry Robertson,

Treasurer: Henry Christian,

Chemist: Charles Corfield,

1863 – Henry St. Clair Massiah was appointed as House Surgeon to the hospital,

1863 – the Hospital reported that it had seen 2146 patients in the months of January and February 1863, of which 115 paid a monthly subscription of 2/6d, 119 were admitted via subcribers, and 162 patients were visited in their own homes, (copy of another report here – prescriptions issued 13,815)

The first dental hospital in Birmingham was founded by Samuel Adams Parker in 1858 at Odd Fellows Hall, Temple Street. In 1863 it moved to the Homeopathic Hospital in Upper Priory, (in 1863 it was moved to 2, Upper Priory to premises shared with the Homeopathic Hospital)…

1865 – The Midland Homeopathic Medical Society, established 1865, met at the hospital,

1866Richard Stephen Wallis was Acting House Surgeon, alongside Joseph Lawrence,

1868 – the hospital was now fully staffed as follows:

Trustees: Edwin Bullock, Robert Lucas Chance, Henry Christian, Abraham Dixon, Josiah Mason, Henry van Wart,

Treasurer: Henry Christian,

Management Committee: Thomas Adams, Edwin Bullock, E A Butler, Benjamin Head Cadbury, John Cadbury, Robert Lucas Chance, Henry Christian, Chas Felton, Rev. William Gover, Benjamin Hudson, W F James, John Jefferys, George B Lloyd, Josiah Mason, Rev. T H Morgan, Richard Sanders, John Suffield,

Staff: Frederick Flint, James Gibbs Blake, Henry R Irwin, Joseph Lawrence, Henry Robertson, Edward Wynne Thomas,

Honorary Secretary: Charles Corfield,

Chemists: Charles Corfield, George Edward Perry,

1869? – Harriet Martineau produced needlework to be sold for the benefit of the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital, and her brother Robert Martineau was a Patron of this hospital, and his daughter Susan Martineau also supported the hospital,

In the mid 1900s many middle class Birmingham women became well known for their philanthropy and charitable work in the city… Susan Martineau (neice of Harriet Martineauwho helped establish a Homeopathic Hospital and worked to encourage poor people to save (money)

1870 – The British Homeopathic Congress met at the hospital under the Presidency of John James Drysdale,

1872The Midland Homeopathic Medical Society, established 1865, met at the hospital (8th session),

1873 – T Holroyd was on the Management Committee of the hospital,

187319 Easy Row, Birmingham: erection of proposed homeopathic hospital  MS 1460/40  n.d. [c.1873] held at the Birmingham City Archives (http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/a2a/records.aspx?cat=143-ms1460&cid=41#41 Easy Row, Birmingham: erection of proposed homeopathic hospital  MS 1460/40  n.d. [c.1873]), submitted by W A Whitwell of Whitwell and Sons, Architects, Birmingham, employer of Yeoville Thomason,

Easy RowThe Birmingham Midland Hospital for Homeopathic and General Treatment 1875 – 1949

(photo of 17 – 19 Easy Row by Phyllis Nicklin in 1960 copyright Keith Berry)

Location: 19 Easy Row, Birmingham. The Conditions of the Hospital are to charge a small weekly (or monthly) subscriptions, but also to treat the poor for free, with a large proportion of patients visited at home (Walter Showell, Showell’s Dictionary of Birmingham, (Echo Library, 30 Sep 2006), Page 123).

1875 – a new purpose built hospital at 19 Easy Row, Birmingham (Christopher Upton, A history of Birmingham, (Phillimore, 30 Sep 1993). Pages 164-165), designed by Yeoville Thomason, was opened, the land puchase cost was £7000 and the site was 1200 square yards, providing a hospital for 100 beds, starting with provision for 40 beds (John Alfred Langford, Modern Birmingham and its institutions: a chronicle of local events, from 1841 to 1871, (E. C. Osborne, 1877)), renamed (Anon, The British Homoeopathic Review, Volume 44, (1900). Pages 188 and 437) the Birmingham and Midland Homeopathic Hospital and Dispensary at this time, and shortly thereafter it published The Report of the Birmingham and Midland Homeopathic Hospital and Dispensary,

1891 – Annie Andrews was Head Matron at the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital in Easy Row,

1892 – John Wingfield LRCP, LRCS Edinburgh was Honorary Physician at the hospital,

1893 – visitors noted that the hospital was ‘flourishing’,

1895 – cases reported from the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital were widely reported in America,

1897Daniel Baker of Baker & Finnemore Ltd left money in his will to the hospital,

1914 – the hospital is still funded entirelyby sponsorship, fund raising, small weekly (or monthly) subscriptions, and donations from wills,

1916Corbett Charles Brame of 247 Selly Oak Road, Kings Norton, Birmingham died 29 April 1916 at The Homeopathic Hospital, Easy Row, Birmingham

1948 – the Eastocte Grange Annex

By 1948, this hospital included the Eastcote Grange Annexe. By 1949 the Eastcote Grange branch was also called Midland Hospital – situated at Eastcote Grange near Hampton in Arden. This branch then took over and the Birmingham branch appears to have closed.

1950 – BIRMINGHAM HALL OF MEMORY Homeopathic Hospital ORIGINAL WATERCOLOUR Thomas Hall – see painting offered for sale on Ebay October 2012

1958the homeopathic hospitals are the main (?only) recruiting and entry point for British Medical graduates at this time...

2007 – Archives of the hospital found at Solihull Hospital,

From The Solihull News 19.9.2007: The past has been brought to life at Solihull Hospital with the discovery of some old documents dating back more than 134 years. Eagle eyed librarians uncovered the rare set of hospital records in a cupboard at the hospital during a search of the archives as part of a project by its arts team. Expenditure records, annual reports and minutes of meetings for Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital were among the records uncovered, with the earliest volume dating back to 1873. The documents are now being handed over to Birmingham City Archives where they will be catalogued and made accessible to the public…

From The British Journal of Nursing November 1927: Ms. A E Wimblett SRN has been appointed Lady Superintendant at the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital  and Dispensary…

1976the minute books 1858 – 1930 of the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital and Dispensary were added to the National Register of the Royal Commission on Historical Manuscripts,

The People involved with the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital and Dispensary

Thomas Adams 1807 – 1873

was a British philanthropist, Justice of the Peace, lace maker and a banker in his later years, who was on the Provisional Committee of Lloyds Bank of Birmingham, First Chairman of the Nottingham Joint Stock Bank, and on the Management Committee of the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital,

As a lacemaker, it is possible that Thomas Adams may well have known Jean Barthelemy Arles Dufour and William Leaf, who were so influential in the introduction of homeopathy into Britain,

James Gibbs Blake 1833 – 1900

BA, MD, MB 1854, MB 1856, winner of a 1854 and 1856 Gold Medal Award from University College Medical College, was an orthodox physician who converted to homeopathy to become the Physician at the Taunton Homeopathic Dispensary, the Wolverhampton Homeopathic Dispensary, Physician at the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital, the Editor of the Monthly Homeopathic Review, member of the Northern Homeopathic Medical Association, member of the British Homeopathic Society, General Secretary to the British Homeopathic Congress in 1882, Vice President of the Midland Homeopathic Society, Chair of the Midland Chemists Association, member of the Royal Sanitary Institute,

James Gibbs Blake was the homeopathic practitioner and Trustee of the Sir Josiah Mason Orphanage alongside Edward Wynne Thomas, and he was also the President, Chairman of the Trustee and the Chairman of the Council of the Mason Science College in Birmingham, and a Co Founder and Vice President of the University of Birmingham,

James Gibbs Blake was the homeopathic physician of Josiah Mason,

Edwin Bullock ?1802 – 1870

was an ironfounder or ironmaster, spring loader hinge maker, and noted art collector, and a Trustee and on the Management Committee of the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital, and a Trustee of a Harmsworth School in Birmingham,

E A Butler ?1802 – ?1886

was a British Clothier, art collector and dealer who was on the Management Committee of the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital, on the Management Committee of the Royal Birmingham and Midland Counties Art Union, a staunch Baptist, E A Butler was a Sponsor of Missionaries to India,E A Butler brought and commissioned art from David Cox, as did his colleague Edwin Bullock,

Benjamin Head Cadbury ?1804 – ?1897

brother of John Cadbury , was also on the Management Committee of the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital,

John Cadbury 1801 – 1889

brother of Benjamin Head Cadbury, he was proprietor of a small chocolate business in Birmingham, England, that later became part of Cadbury plc, one of the world’s largest chocolate producers.

John Cadbury was on the Management Committee, and paid for and built the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital in Cambridge Street, and he also manufactured Homeopathic Cocoa (Homeopathic Cocoa was so named because it contained arrowroot, but it actually had no connection to homeopathy in essence, but ‘homeopathy’ was such a popular term at this time, it would sell anything! Homeopathic Cocoa was ‘renowned for its supposed medicinal qualities’),

John Cadbury also campained against alcohol, and he led a campaign to ban the use of child labour for sweeping chimneys and campaigned against animal cruelty, forming the Animals Friend Society, a forerunner of the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

Robert Lucas Chance 1782 – 1865

Chance Brothers and Company was a glassworks originally based in Spon Lane, Smethwick, West Midlands (formerly in Staffordshire), in England. It was a leading glass manufacturer and a pioneer of British glassmaking technology.

Robert Lucas Chance was a Founder, Sponsor and Trustee, and on the Management Committee of the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital,

Robert Lucas Chance supplied optical glass to Charles Darwin,

Chance Brothers and Company was “… the greatest glass manufacturer in Britain”, who were responsible for the glazing of the original Crystal Palace to house the Great Exhibition of 1851, and the Houses of Parliament, and they made the opal glass for the four faces of the Westminster Clock Tower which house the famous bell, Big Ben. The ornamental windows for the White House in America were also made by them.

Through twists and turns, at one time being part of the Pilkington Group, Chance Glass Limited is still a successful company today, retaining the historical Chance logo.

Henry Christian ?1807 – ?1891

was a Solicitor and an Attorney, Auditor of Lloyds Bank and the Birmingham Banking Company, Director of the Midland Financial Company, and the Treasurer and a Trustee at the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital,

Charles Corfield 1819 – 1890

was a British homeopathic chemist at 26, Bennetts Hill, Birmingham, and at the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital and Dispensary,Charles Corfield’s brother Richard Corfield, attended Shrewsbury School with Charles Darwin, and Charles Darwin stayed in his home in Valparaiso in 1834 and in 1835,

Abraham Dixon junior 1820 – 1900

was a British manufacturer at Abraham Dixon and Co, and the Director and Principle Partner of Rabone Brothers, who travelled frequently to Brussels, and became a most wealthy merchant, Abraham Dixon junior was a Trustee of the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital, and a sponsor of the Birmingham Royal Institution for the Blind,

Abraham Dixon junior was also a prizewinning pig breeder, and horticulturalist, and it is possible he knew the family of Edwin Bullock at the local Farmer’s fairs, where the Bullock family also exhibited Game Fowl, Abraham Dixon junior also submitted lunation returns to the House of Commons, an interest he shared with his friend, homeopath James Johnstone,

John James Drysdale 1816 – 1890

MD Edin. 1816 – 1890 elder brother of Charles Robert Drysdale and the editor of the British Journal of Homeopathy.John James Drysdale was a student of James Young Simpson in Edinburgh, alongside Thomas Skinner, and he also knew William Henderson.

The Drysdales were friends of Catharine Crowe and familiar with the social circle of the day which included Charles Dickens and Charles Darwin. John Chapman who edited the Westminster Review, and in 1841, a Dr. (John?) Chapman and John James Drysdale opened the Liverpool Homeopathic Dispensary at 14 Benson Street.

George Fearon 1817 – 1861

MD Edin 1838, MRSCE Giessen 1840, was a British orthodox physician who converted to homeopathy and who was the first homeopath to practice in Birmingham at the Birmingham Homeopathic Dispensary, and whose efforts raised the finances for the Midland Homeopathic Hospital.

George Fearon was a member of the British Homeopathic Society and also Secretary to the British Homeopathic Congress.

Charles Felton ?1805 – ?1879

was a British manufacturer, floricultiralist, prize winning cock breeder and pig breeder, supporter of Temperance, and a supporter of the Old Crown Public House at Der Yat End (Deritend), a sponsor of missionaries, and a member of the Management Committee of the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital,

Frederick Flint ?1839 – ?1893

MD, CM Aberdeen, MRCS England 1866, was a British orthodox physician who converted to homeopathy to become a House Surgeon at the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital, and a Dispensing Chemist at the Wolverhampton and Stafford Homeopathic Dispensary, and he also worked at the Scarborough Homeopathic Dispensary,

John Mason Galloway 1826?  – 1892?

MD Edinburgh 1852, was a British orthodox physician who converted to homeopathy to become House Surgeon at the Manchester Homeopathic Hospital, Surgeon at the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital, Medical Officer at the Wigan Homeopathic Dispensary, a member of the Northern Homeopathic Medical Association, Secretary to the Homeopathic Congress, Honorary Secretary to the Manchester Homeopathic Medico Chirurgical Society,

Rev. William Gover ?1805 – ?1886

MA Cabridge, was a British parish priest, Honorary Canon at the Cathedral Church of Worcester, at St. Andrews in Holborn, at Somerstown Chapel in London, Principal of the Worcester Diocesan Training College, Principal of the Normal Training School in Saltey in Birmingham (for the training of Masters for Elementary Schools), member of the Committee of Council on Education, member of Somersetshire Archaeological and Natural History Society, member of the Egypt Exploration Society, Fellow of the Geological Society of London, member of the National Society for Promoting the Education of the Poor in the Principles of the Established Church, member of the National Association for the Promotion of Social Science, Chairman and member of various other Associations and Parliamentary Committees, prizewinning duck breeder, and member of the Management Committee of the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital,

Rev. William Gover was eager to support the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital, as he had sent hundreds of people to the homeopathic dispensary in the in the sixteen years he had lived in Birmingham,

William Headland ?1800 – 1860

was a publisher and chemist, member of the British Homeopathic Society, described by his homeopathic colleagues as ‘our first chemist‘ and ‘our chief homeopathic chemist‘, stocked a wide range of homeopathic books, products and supplies, and he supplied remedies to all the early British homeopaths, and he published their books  and writings,

William Headland founded Headland & Co in 1860, and he was the homeopathic chemist of the London Homeopathic Medical Institution at 17 Hanover Square in 1840, the Islington Homeopathic Dispensary, the West London Homeopathic Dispensary, (and he supplied 19 other homeopathic dispensaries all over Britainn), and he was capable of preparing high dilutions to the 200th and 800th dilutions (along the lines of Caspar Julius Jenichen by 1851).

Benjamin Hudson 1796 – 1875

was a British printer, stationer and bookseller, the ‘oldest bookshop in Birmingham’ (established 1821 – he spent 54 years in one shop), operating as B Hudson and Son from 18 Bull Street in Birmingham, member of the Committee at the Spring Hill College in Birmingham, was on the Management Committee of the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital,B Hudson and Son published The Philanthropist – first published as The Reformer), which operated only for four years, and which produced copies for private circulation only, but which became influential enough to voice the mood for social change at that time,

B Hudson and Son also printed books and pamphlets by John Angell James, Robert Owen, Joseph Sturge, books produced by the National Association for the Promotion of Social Science founded by Henry Peter Brougham 1st Baron Brougham and Vaux, works promoting abolitionism, emancipation, labour relations, temperance, and many other liberal causes of the day,

Henry R Irwin ?1834 – ?1902

LFPS Glasgow 1861, was a British orthodox physician who converted to homeopathy to become a Surgeon at the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital, a member of the Midland Homeopathic Society, a Medical Officer at the Caledonian Fire and Life Insurance Company,

W F James ?1806 – ?1887

was a British Auditor, member of the Committee at the Spring Hill College in Birmingham, Secretary of the The Bible Christian magazine, and a member of the Management Committee of the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital, W F James wrote Seven years’ pioneer mission work in Cardiff,

John Jefferys ?1816 – ?1888

was a British Barrister (Lincoln’s Inn 1835),  on the Management Committee of the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital, John Jefferys lived at 39 Waterloo Street, Birmingham,

George Stevenson Knowles 1820 – 1861

LRCGP Belfast, MD Edinburgh 1851, the second son of James Sheridan Knowles, and the brother of Richard Brinsley Knowles, was a British orthodox physician who converted to homeopathy, Physician at the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital,

Joseph Lawrence ?1814 – ?1873

was a homeopath at the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital, the Wolverhampton and Stafford Homeopathic Dispensary, and at The Birmingham Homeopathic Dispensary,

George B Lloyd 1824 – 1903

was a British Banker at Lloyds Bank of Birmingham, a Sponsor of the Birmingham General Hospital, Sponsor of the Queen’s Hospital, and on the Management Committee of the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital,

George B Lloyd was a member of a Quaker family, the brother of Sampson Samuel Lloyd junior MP 1820 – 1899, and the cousin of James Lloyd 1806 – 1863 and Thomas Lloyd 1814 – 1890, who were all Sponsors of various Birmingham Charities and Hospitals, (Sampson Samuel Lloyd was an auditor of the Birmingham General Hospital alongside homeopath William Sharp, the President of the Midland Homeopathic Society in 1866), and as members of Lloyds Bank of Birmingham, this family was quite central to life in this City at this time.

Harriet Martineau 1802 – 1876 and her brother Robert Martineau

was an English writer and philosopher, renowned in her day as a controversial journalist, political economist, abolitionist and life long feminist.Harriet Martineau was an ardent supporter of homeopathy, and she was also a patient of John Elliotson.

Harriet Martineau’s life was changed forever when she received treatment from Mersmerist Spencer Timothy Hall.

Harriet Martineau produced needlework to be sold for the benefit of the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital, and her brother Robert Martineau was a Patron of this hospital, and his daughter Susan Martineau helped establish the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital and worked to encourage poor people to save (money)

Harriet Martineau knew Charlotte Bronte, Florence Nightingale and Mary Fairfax Greig Somerville, and she was part of a social set which included Charles Babbage, Thomas Carlyle, publisher John Chapman, Moncure Daniel Conway, Charles Darwin and his brother Erasmus Alvey Darwin, Charles Dickens, John Elliotson, George Everest and his brother, homeopath Thomas Roupell Everest, Robert Everest (?brother of George Everest and Thomas Roupell Everest, a geographer who lived in India), Thomas Henry Huxley, Charles Lyell, and James John Garth Wilkinson.

Harriet Martineau was a fervent supporter of Florence Nightingale and actively supported her friend in her work. Harriet Martineau was an enthusiastic advocate of homeopathy, telling Florence Nightingale in 1860,

I am much further in approbation of homeopathy (than you are), (having watched it for twenty three years) “I am as sure as I can be of anything future that it will supercede any other principle and method yet known.”

Harriet also tells Florence Nightingale that the Town Council in Liverpool has voted money for homeopathic dispensaries, which had eased the ‘dreadful paucity’ of qualified practitioners there.

Josiah Mason 17951881

was an English pen manufacturer, Philanthropist, Trustee and member of the Management Committee, and major sponsor of the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital, and the Co-founder of the Mason Science College in Birmingham, which evolved into the University of Birmingham,

On 12.12.1870, James Gibbs Blake, Josiah Mason and George James Johnson executed the Foundation Deed of the University of Birmingham:

Josiah Mason was a patient of James Gibbs Blake and Edward Wynne Thomas

In 1858 Josiah Mason opened almshouses in Station Road, Erdington, Birmingham, for spinsters and widows over 50 and orphan girls, providing accommodation in furnished rooms 14ft x 11ft with coal, gas and a small annual income provided.

These premises proving inadequate to the purpose, in 1869 a second, larger orphanage was opened in Bell Lane (now Orphanage Road), Erdington, with rooms for 26 women and dormitories for 300 children.

The health of the children was placed under the care of two homeopathic practitioners James Gibbs Blake (trustee) and Edward Wynne Thomas).

Rev. T H Morgan ?1812 – ?1872

was a British Baptist Minister, at Harrow on the  Hill in Middlesex, Secretary and Minister of the Baptist Association in Birmingham, the Principal of the Birmingham Scholastic Institution for the Sons of Ministers, Principal of the Shireland Hall School, member of the British and Irish Baptist home mission, member of the Society for the liberation of religion from State patronage and control, and on the Management Committee of the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital,Rev. T H Morgan was a supporter of John Bright, and an abolitionist,

William Parsons 1804 – 1872

MRCS, MD was a British orthodox physician who converted to homeopathy, to become a physician at the Birmingham Homeopathic Dispensary, the Canterbury Homeopathic Dispensary, and the Dover Homeopathic DispensaryWilliam Parsons was a Resident Physician at a small hospital at Paul Francois Curie’s house,

George Edward Perry ?1802 – ?1879

was a British homeopathic chemist who practiced at 171 Hagley Road, Edgebaston, Birmingham, and at 6 Norwood Villas, Edgbaston, Birmingham,

Henry Robertson ?1801 – ?1879

LSA London 1828, was a British orthodox physician who converted to homeopathy, to become the Vice President of the Midland Homeopathic Medical Society, a Medical Officer at the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital, member of the British Homeopathic Society, member of the Westminster Medical Society, member of the Hahnemannian Medical Society,

Richard Sanders ?1815 – ?1876

was a British Cooper in 1850, a toy dealer in 1861, and thereafter an Agent, specifically a Tin and Copper Smelter’s Agent (to William Forster and Co), and on the Management Committee of the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital,

Evelyn John Shirley MP 1788 – 1856

was British landed gentry, whose family had lived Eatington (Ettington) Park, Stratford upon Avon, Warwickshire, and at Lough Fea, Carrickmacross, Co. Monaghan (The Shirley estate, with the adjoining Bath estate, were two of the largest in the county), since the Norman conquest, who was a sponsor of the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital, (notably £500 donated to the hospital – presumably in his will),

Henry St Clair Massiah ?1810 – ?1893

was a British orthodox physician who converted to homeopathy, to become House Surgeon to the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital, St. Clair Massiah wrote Smallpox and its Treatment, Therapeutics of the Day,

John Suffield 1802 – 1891

was a British Laceman and Lace Dealer, Hosier, Glover and Carpet Warehouseman, Sponsor of the Blue Coat School in Birmingham, and on the Management Committee of the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital,

John Suffield was the great grandfather of J R R Tolkien (by marriage),

Yeoville Thomason 1826 – 1901

was an architect in Birmingham, England. He was born in Edinburgh to a Birmingham family. Thomason set up his own practice in Birmingham 1853-1854. He was a grandson of Sir Edward Thomason, a button and toy maker in Birmingham. He was a pupil of Charles Edge, and after qualifying as architect he worked for the borough surveyor. He designed the Council House after winning a competition. He retired in 1896.

Thomason’s connections within the City soom provided him with regular work, and between 1874 and 1884 he was almost continuously engaged on the construction of the Council House and the first extension to it, comprising the Art Gallery and the Gas Department.

From soon after he had qualified he managed the architectural department of the borough surveyor’s office, and public architecture was well suited to his taste for rather florid Italianate design.

Towards the end of his career he became architect to the Birmingham, Dudley & District Banking Co., and the collection contains designs for several banks in and around the West Midlands.

Cooper Whitwell was in practice at 40 Bennetts Hill by 1883, but not until 1887 do the names Thomason & Whitwell appear linked in partnership: they moved in the same year to 1 Cannon St. Whitwell seems to have undertaken almost all the firm’s work, however, and Thomason went into retirement.

He died in London in 1901.

Whitwell dropped the pretence of a partnership in 1894, and by 1899 the firm had become C Whitwell & Son., which it remained until its dissolution in 1953: latterly the partners were William A. Whitwell and Arthur W. Whitwell.

From 1899 it was based at 23 Temple Row, by 1923 it had moved to 9 Newhall St and in the following year it moved again to 3 Newhall St.

In 1952 the Whitwell brothers apparently abandoned their town office and continued the practice from their home address, Newborough House, Newborough Road, Shirley, for a further year.

Richard Stephen Wallis 1838 – ?1907

MRCS England 1859, was an orthodox physician, member of the Royal College of Surgeons, who converted to homeopathy to be come a Physician at the Banbury Homeopathic Dispensary, Acting House Surgeon at the Birmingham Homeopathic Dispensary, and a member of the Midland Homeopathic Society,Wallis also practiced at Cleobury Mortimer, Shropshire, 6 South Parade, Weston Super Mare, and at 5 South Bar, Banbury,

Wallis was born in Carlington in Banbury, and he married Helen Sowerby,

Henry van Wart 1784 – 1873

an American (Dutch by descent) who became British by special act of Parliament, founded the Birmingham Stock Exchange, he was a Magistrate, and served as one of Birmingham’s first Aldermen and a director of the Birmingham Banking Company.Henry van Wart was a Trustee of the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital, and the brother in law of Washington Irving,

John Wingfield ?1859 – ?1927

LRCP, LRCS Edinburgh, LFPS Glasgow 1886, was a British orthodox physician who converted to homeopathy to become was Honorary Physician at the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital, John Wingfield practiced at Aubyn House, Alcester Road, Moseley,

Edward Wynne Thomas ?1830 – 1893

MRCS England 1857, MB University of London 1858 Gold Medalist, LSA London 1858, was a British orthodox physician, Surgeon at the South Stafford General Hospital, who converted to homeopathy, to become a Physician at the Wolverhampton and Stafford Homeopathic Dispensary, a Surgeon at the Birmingham Homeopathic Hospital, the President of the British Homeopathic SocietyHonorary Secretary of the Midland Homeopathic Medical Society,

Edward Wynne Thomas was a homeopathic practitioner at the Sir Josiah Mason Orphanage,

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