Marie Elizabeth Zakrzewska 1829 – 1902

Marie Elizabeth ZakrzewskaMarie Zakrzewska 1829 – 1902 was a German born physician of Polish descent who made her name as a pioneering female doctor in the United States.

Zakrzewska confessed to Elizabeth Blackwell her dislike of drugs, admitting that her ‘whole success in practice’ was based on viewing medicines as ‘secondary’ often using drugs as placebos.

‘I have the reputation…. as giving hardly any medicine but teaching people how to keep well without it… I can assure you it is far harder, requiring more strength, and more endurance and patience to practice hygiene than what is called medicine’.

Zakrzewska also admits to Blackwell that she uses medicines in ‘infinitesimal doses‘. Continue reading Marie Elizabeth Zakrzewska 1829 – 1902

Clemens Maria Franz Baron von Boenninghausen 1785 – 1864

BoenninghausenClemens Maria Franz Baron von Boenninghausen 1785 – 1864 was a German Baron, lawyer and agriculturalist who became a student of Samuel Hahnemann when his friend and colleague Carl Ernst August Weihe 1779 – 1834 cured him of tuberculosis, after his allopathic doctors had given up on him.

Boenninghausen began practicing as a veterinary homeopath before he began treating people, and he became a lay practitioner, and he was the homeopath of Eugenie de Montijo, the wife of Napoleon III.

In 1843, Boenninghausen was allowed to practice homeopathy by Royal Decree.

In 1861, Napoleon III awarded Clemens Maria Franz Baron von Boenninghausen the Knights Cross of the Legion of Honour.

Boenninghausen‘s eldest son Karl was also a homeopath, and he married the adopted daughter of Melanie Hahnemann. Another son Friedrich Paul 1828 – 1910 was also a homeopath. Continue reading Clemens Maria Franz Baron von Boenninghausen 1785 – 1864

August Karl Gustav Bier 1861 – 1949

august bierAugust Karl Gustav Bier 1861 – 1949 was German surgeon and the pioneer of spinal anaesthesia.

Bier was unusual for being very open minded in his support of homeopathy, even though he came across the same sort of ‘religious cult‘ in science we encounter today. As late as 1925, August Bier was censured by the Berlin medical profession for attempting to rehabilitate Samuel Hahnemann‘s reputation.

Bier kept in close contact with Hugo Paul Friedrich Schulz and his work on hormesis, and Bier went on to found the Society for Examination of Homeopathic Drugs.

Bier wrote:

Above all, I am of the opinion that no one should judge homeopathy, who has not tried homeopathic remedies or who has failed by reading to familiarise himself with the theory of homeopathy.

“I advise my colleagues who want to do the latter, not to start with Samuel Hahnemann‘s writings, but first to study the excellent work by Richard Haehl, and at least a few works by Hugo Paul Friedrich Schulz…”

Continue reading August Karl Gustav Bier 1861 – 1949