Arthur James Melhuish (1829-1895)

National Portrait Gallery Arthur James Melhuish (1829-1895) was a famous and innovative British photographer, and a member of the Royal Meteorological Society and the Royal Astronomical Society.

Melhuish was a friend of James John Garth Wilkinson and is listed in his address book at 58 Pall Mall, the British Museum of Portraits. Both James John Garth Wilkinson and Melhuish were interested in spiritualism, and Melhuish did some work on The Geology of the Bible and The Truth about Ghosts, both subjects close to James John Garth Wilkinson‘s heart. Melhuish also wrote about Mental analysis, another subject he would share with James John Garth Wilkinson (Swedenborg Archive Address Book of James John Garth Wilkinson dated 1895. See also Arthur James Melhuish, A Ghostly Annual: The Truth about Ghosts … Together with a Reprint of Letters from The Daily Telegraph, (H. Vickers, 1883). See also Arthur J Melhuish, Mental analysis, (Longmans, Green, Reader, & Dyer, 1867).).

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Co-operative Movement and Homeopathy

 Rochdale Co-op The Co-operative Commonwealth was first so named in 1866 by homeopath James John Garth Wilkinson.

In Britain in 1866, historians of the Co-Operative Society believe that the first usage of the term ‘… Co-Operative Commonwealth…’ was coined initially by James John Garth Wilkinson in an address to the members of the St. John’s Wood Co-Operative Society (Stephen Yeo, New Views of Co-Operation, (Taylor & Francis, 1988). Page 88. See also William Henry Brown, Co-operative Managers National Co-operative Managers Association, (1937). Page 60. See also http://www.co-op.ac.uk/our-heritage/national-co-operative-archive/collections/personal-papers/#whb) Continue reading Co-operative Movement and Homeopathy

Henry Irving (1838-1905)

Henry Irving (1838-1905) Henry Irving (1838-1905) ‘… born John Henry Brodribb, was an English stage actor in the Victorian era, known as an actor-manager because he took complete responsibility (supervision of sets, lighting, direction, casting, as well as playing the leading roles) for season after season at the Lyceum Theatre, establishing himself and his company as representative of English classical theatre. He was the first actor to be awarded a knighthood. Irving is thought to have been the inspiration for the title character in Bram Stoker‘s 1897 novel Dracula…’

Henry Irving was a friend of James John Garth Wilkinson and his name is listed in both of James John Garth Wilkinson‘s address books at 15a Grafton Street, Bond Street W London (Swedenborg Archive Address Book of James John Garth Wilkinson dated 1895. See also Swedenborg Archive A183r Address Book of James John Garth Wilkinson ‘Where is it’ dated 1.10.1892). Henry Irving and James John Garth Wilkinson were both friends of Edward Bulwer Lytton and Alfred Lord Tennyson.

Henry Irving was a patient of Emmanuel de Marney Baruch (?-?),  homeopathic physician to the famous (Neil Gould, Victor Herbert: A Theatrical Life, (Fordham Univ Press, 1 Aug 2009). Page 509), and he was possibly a patient of James John Garth Wilkinson when he was in London?

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Boyd Robert Horsbrugh (1871-1916)

Boyd Robert Horsbrugh (1871-1916) Boyd Robert Horsbrugh (1871-1916) ‘… was an English ornithologist and military man…’

Boyd Horsbrugh was a friend of James John Garth Wilkinson and his name is in both of James John Garth Wilkinson‘s address books at the East India Service Club, and at 16 St. James’s Square, and he is also listed as Major Horsbrugh at the Army and Navy Club in Pall Mall. (Swedenborg Archive Address Book of James John Garth Wilkinson dated 1895. See also Swedenborg Archive Address Book of James John Garth Wilkinson ‘Where is it’ dated 1.10.1892). NB: ?(could the spelling be Horsburgh?) (Is this the right man?) listed in both of Garth Wilkinson‘s address books at the East India Service Club, and at 16 St. James’s Square, and there is also a Major Horsbrugh listed at the Army and Navy Club in Pall Mall. (There are two other entries in the ‘Where is it?’ address book for Horsbrugh; another entry for Boyd Horsbrugh though The East India United Service Club, 16 St. James’s Square, SW is crossed out and ‘deceased’ is written next to his name, which makes me doubt this is indeed Boyd Robert Horsbrugh (1871-1916)? Three names below is another entry for Major Horsbrugh at The Citadel, Cairo, Egypt (crossed out) as if these are two separate people? Why did Garth Wilkinson think Boyd Horsbrugh was ‘deceased’, and who is Major Horsbrugh? I would not put any weight on this identification at this time!

Continue reading Boyd Robert Horsbrugh (1871-1916)

John Henry Gray (1866-1934)

John Henry Gray (1866-1934) John Henry Gray (1866-1934) ‘… was an English poet… It has often been suggested that he was the inspiration behind Oscar Wilde‘s fictional Dorian Gray…’

John Henry Gray was a friend of James John Garth Wilkinson and his name is in both of James John Garth Wilkinson‘s address books at 3 Plowden Buildings, Temple, and also at the Foreign Office. (Swedenborg Archive Address Book of James John Garth Wilkinson dated 1895. See also Swedenborg Archive Address Book of James John Garth Wilkinson ‘Where is it’ dated 1.10.1892.). Was he also a patient of James John Garth Wilkinson following his breakdown in 1892?

John Henry Gray wrote an article for The Dial in 1893 entitled Garth Wilkinson (John Henry GreyGarth Wilkinson, The Dial, No: 21-24, (1893) (concerning James John Garth Wilkinson’s book Improvisations of the Spirit published in 1857). See also Jerusha Hull McCormack, John Gray: poet, dandy, and priest, (Brandeis University Press, 1991). Page 282. See also http://archives.li.man.ac.uk/ead/search?operation=full&recid=gb133jhg). Continue reading John Henry Gray (1866-1934)

Robert Nisbet Bain (1854–1909)

British Museum Robert Nisbet Bain (1854–1909) ‘… was a British historian and linguist who worked for the British Museum…’

Bain was a friend of James John Garth Wilkinson and his name is listed in both of James John Garth Wilkinson‘s address books at the British Library and at 46 Hildrop Road, N [London] (Swedenborg Archive Address Book of James John Garth Wilkinson dated 1895. See also Swedenborg Archive A183r Address Book of James John Garth Wilkinson ‘Where is it’ dated 1.10.1892). Continue reading Robert Nisbet Bain (1854–1909)

Gerard Baldwin Brown (1849-1932)

Gerard Baldwin Brown (1849-1932)

 Gerard Baldwin Brown (1849-1932) ‘… was a British art historian…’  (picture from http://www.darvillsrareprints.com/University%20of%20Edinburgh%20officers%20William%20Brassey%20Hole%201884.htm)

Gerald Baldwin Brown was a friend of James John Garth Wilkinson, and his name is in James John Garth Wilkinson‘s address book (Swedenborg Archive  Address Book of James John Garth Wilkinson dated 1895 and also in Swedenborg Archive Address Book of James John Garth Wilkinson ‘Where is it’ dated 1.10.1892 – listed at 3 Roseberry Crescent Edinburgh in both address books). See also Elizabeth Baldwin Brown, In memoriam: James Baldwin Brown, (1884). Page 70).

Gerald Baldwin Brown’s father James Baldwin Brown (1820-1884) was a committee member of the Brixton Homeopathic Dispensary (Anon, The Homeopathic Medical Directory of Great Britain and Ireland, and Annual Abstract of British and American Homeopathic Serial Literature, (1873). Page 115). Garth Wilkinson wrote his obituary in 1884, and he said of him: ‘… In my walks through life, I remember no figure more cheering, brave, and upright. To talk with him was always to quit the world for the time, and to enter upon a freedom that belonged to his spirit. No matter whether we were agreed or not, there was a loving ‘gentilelesse’ present which made us seem to get the point of agreement out of the conversation. There was an enlargement of love… (Anon, Evangelical Magazine with which is Issued The Missionary Chronicle, Volume 14, (1884). Page 363.’

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Charles Bradlaugh (1833-1891)

Charles Bradlaugh (1833-1891)  Charles Bradlaugh (1833-1891) was a political activist and one of the most famous English atheists of the 19th century. He founded the National Secular Society in 1866.

Charles Bradlaugh supported the Anti Compulsory Vaccination movement (Hilda Kean, London stories: personal lives, public histories, (Rivers Oram, 2004). Page 217). Bradlaugh also actively supported contraception, and he worked alongside homeopaths and supporters of homeopaths to do this.

It would be the Drysdale family and the homeopathic community, ably assisted by radical free thinkers, who would come out to support the embattled trio. Against the usual fierce and vitriolic storm of protest, the collaboration of Charles Bradlaugh and the Drysdale family, fully supported by the homeopathic press (Elizabeth K. Helsinger, THE WOMAN QUESTION Social Issues, 1837-1883(Manchester University Press, 1983). Page 219)), enabled the firm foundation of modern birth control to become a reality in Britain (Robert Jütte, Contraception: A History, (Polity, 12 May 2008). Page 108).

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Charles Kingsley (1819-1875)

Charles Kingsley (1819-1875)Charles Kingsley (1819-1875) ‘… was a priest of the Church of England, a university professor, historian and novelist. He is particularly associated with the West Country and northeast Hampshire. He was a friend and correspondent with Charles Darwin…’

Charles Kingsley wrote about homeopathy in his novel Two years ago: ‘… Elsley need not be blamed for pitying her; only for holding, with most of our poets, a vague notion that her woes were to be cured by a hair of the dog who bit her; viz., by homeopathic doses of that same “art” which has been all along her morbid and self- deceiving substitute for virtue and industry...’ NB: the ‘she’ in question is not a woman but a country, namely Italy. (Charles Kingsley, Two years ago, (Macmillan and co., 1857). Page 256.)

41 years later, Willis Alonzo Dewey praised Charles Kingsley’s vivid and accurate description of Cholera in the Medical Century: The National Journal of Homeopathic Medicine and Surgery, Volume 6: ‘… Thus Charles Kingsley, in his “Two years ago,” gives an account of a cholera epidemic which is not surpassed in accuracy of description by any medical work…’ (Willis Alonzo DeweyMedical Century: The National Journal of Homeopathic Medicine and Surgery, Volume 6, (1898). Page 224). Continue reading Charles Kingsley (1819-1875)

William Sewell (1781–1853)

William Sewell (1781–1853) ‘… was the second principal of the The Royal Veterinary College London Veterinary College, succeeding William Coleman who died in 1839…’

William Sewell was the uncle by marriage of James John Garth Wilkinson and a patient of Paul Francois Curie:

On 2nd November 1894, James John Garth Wilkinson, wrote to William Boericke from 4 Finchley Road: ‘… Mr dear Dr. Boericke, … . It may interest you to know that I am the nephew by marriage of Professor William Sewell, for long the most famous Veterinarian in England, & for 50 years virtually the head of the Veterinary College. I lived with him, & attended his lectures, & the practice of the College. He was one of the finest & noblest Gentlemen I ever knew, A Quaker by Descent, connected to the Penn Family. He was Veterinary Advisor to the East India Company. He died in a good old age, attended Homeopathically by Dr. Curie [Paul Francois Curie] & myself… (Swedenborg Archive K125 [2] Letter dated 2.11.1894 from James John Garth Wilkinson, to William Boericke)…’

 

On 29th September 1825, James John Garth Wilkinson wrote from his school to his aunt Mary Robinson (Harriet Robinson’s sister) at Seymour Place requesting some eye water ‘… as my eyes are very bad…’ and asking for some trousers and some gloves. Mary Robinson is obviously looking after the children and the family home during this horrendous time after Harriet’s death (Garth Wilkinson’s mother), though the archives (Swedenborg Archive Family Register A148a Temple Bar loose leaf Documents and Summary Enclosed English Documents from 1662 (Latin documents begin 1621)) also record the happier circumstance that she was courting a William Sewell (1780-1853), who sent Garth Wilkinson a gift of some grapes, and news that they were about to be married. On 28th November 1825, James John Wilkinson senior wrote to James John Garth Wilkinson, from 1 Pump Court to inform him that Mary Robinson and William Sewell were to be married on 29th November 1825, and how upset he will be to loose her help at home…

 

From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Sewell_(physician) ‘… Sewell was the son of an Essex farmer and of Quaker descent. At age 15, he was apprenticed to Coleman and remained at the college for 57 years. In 1815 and 1816, he was sent by the College governors to the European continent to visit veterinary schools.

Upon graduation from the college at age 18, he was appointed Demonstrator (e.g., professor) in Anatomy, and in 1803, he was named Assistant Professor. He was charged with maintaining discipline at the College. His life was devoted to the study of horses. His biographers described Sewell as a reserved man, unsociable, hesitating, and unpopular with the students and the profession. However, he remained loyal to Coleman. 

He popularized the operation of neurectomy, the surgical removal of a nerve in horses, in 1817. In 1825, he reported that glanders was an infectious disease which affected horses’ lungs and reported that the cure for glanders was copper sulfate. In 1835, he introduced the operation of periosteum to treat splints and sprain in horses. He was considered an expert in lameness in horses. In 1829, he performed the first operation for bladder stones in horses. 

Sewell gradually stopped teaching, and became the director of the London Veterinary School, its Secretary, and its Resident governor. In 1852, Sewell was elected President of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons. He died in June 1853 at the age of 72 and was buried at Highgate. He married late in life and left no family…’

 

See also http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wikipedia:WikiProject_Missing_encyclopedic_articles/DNB_Epitome_51 William Sewell (1780-1853) ‘… veterinarian; obtained diploma, 1799; assistant to Edward Coleman (?l764-1839), second principal of Veterinary College, London; made supposed discovery of channel pervading the medulla spinalis 1803; rediscovered neurotomy, 1818; President of Veterinary Medical Society, 1835-6; Principal of Veterinary College, 1839; President of Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons, 1852. Professor William Sewell was the Assistant Professor at the Royal Veterinary College in 1837. The first meeting of the Veterinary Medical Association was held in the Freemasons Tavern in Great Queen Street in 1837, with the introductory Oration, given by the President of the Veterinary Medical Association Professor William Sewell, held in the Freemasons’ Hall next door…’