William Warren Vernon 1834 – 1919

London Homeopathic HospitalWilliam Warren Vernon 1834 – 1919, the second son of George John Warren Vernon 5th Baron Vernon, was a scholar of Dante,

William Warren Vernon was a patient of Hugh Cameron, and he was on the House Committee of the London Homeopathic Hospital, and an active advocate and sponsor of the London Homeopathic Hospital, and in 1866, Augustus Henry Vernon (brother of William Warren Vernon) and William Warren Vernon were part of the of the Association for the Trial of Preventative and Curative Treatment in the Cattle Plague by the Homeopathic Method, William Warren Vernon was also active in the British Homeopathic Society, ( Recollections of Seventy-Two Years. William Warren Vernon. BiblioBazaar, 2009.)

William Warren Vernon had been an advocate of homeopathy for many years before he settled in London. His brother Augustus Henry Vernon and his sister Adelaide were already patients of homeopaths, and soon he had met Hugh Cameron and the rest of his family became firm advocates and supporters of homeopathy,

In 1866, Augustus Henry Vernon (brother of William Warren Vernon) and William Warren Vernon were part of the of the Association for the Trial of Preventative and Curative Treatment in the Cattle Plague by the Homeopathic Method, with William Pitt Amherst 2nd Earl Amherst, Henry Charles FitzRoy Somerset 8th Duke of Beaufort, Ralph Buchan, William Alleyne Cecil Lord Burghley 3rd Marquess of Exeter, George Thomas Keppel 6th Earl of Albemarle, William Coutts Keppel Viscount Bury 7th Earl of Albemarle (the Earl of Albemarle’s son), James Key Caird 1st Baronet, Colonel Challoner, George Grimston Craven 3rd Earl of Craven, Henry William Dashwood 5th Baronet, C J Dring, Patrick Dudgeon, Robert Grosvenor 1st Baron Ebury, Francis Richard Charteris 10th Earl of Wemyss Lord Elcho, Arthur Algernon Capell 6th Earl of Essex, Richard Grosvenor Earl Grosvenor 2nd Marquess of Westminster, Philip Howard Frere, Edward Kerrison, Henry Charles Keith Petty Fitzmaurice 5th Marquess of Lansdowne, Lord Llanover, Colonel Farnaby Lennard, George Loch, Archibald Keppel MacDonald, Arthur de Vere Capell Viscount Malden, John Villiers Shelley, John Winston Spencer Churchill 7th Duke of Marlborough (Chairman), Frederick Francis Maude, William Miles, James Moore, Charles Gordon Lennox 5th Duke of Richmond, Charles Marsham 3rd Earl of Romney, Sir Anthony Rothschild, John Robert Townshend 1st Earl Sydney, Lt. Colonel Charles Towneley, Arthur Richard Wellesley 2nd Duke of Wellington (1807-1884), William Wells,

In 1866, the Treasury placed rooms at Adelphi Terrace at the disposal of John Winston Spencer Churchill 7th Duke of Marlborough, who was the Chairman of the Association for the Trial of Preventative and Curative Treatment in the Cattle Plague by the Homeopathic Method, based on the research done in Belgium by Edward Hamilton, with John Winston Spencer Churchill 7th Duke of Marlborough overseeing the work of Edward Hamilton, George Lennox Moore, James Moore and Alfred Crosby Pope.

William Coutts Keppel Viscount Bury 7th Earl of Albemarle issued an address or report for the Association for the Trial of Preventative and Curative Treatment in the Cattle Plague by the Homeopathic Method in 1866. Bury reported that the Dutch had experienced such success with homeopathy against that cattle plague, that they had authorised Edward Hamilton to visit Holland to investigate this.

Edward Hamilton discovered that the Dutch had treated 4798 cattle, 1031 were destroyed = 3767 were treated (with a mixture of allopathic and homeopathic treatments), the survival rate for the beasts treated was 45%, and the survival rate for the beasts treated only by homeopathy was 72-5%.

The Dutch Government had agreed to allow E Seutin, a homeopathic chemist, the total control of infected cattle in Matterness, and initially, E Seutin saved 70% of the cattle, though latterly, he had saved 9 out of every 10 beasts brought to him for treatment, and E Seutin’s use of homeoprophylaxic treatment of unifected beasts brought the epidemic under control entirely within four weeks. Matterness was pronounced free from infection and it has remained thus ever since. The remedies used were arsenicum, phosphorus, phos ac, rhus tox and sulphur.

In 1866, George Lennox Moore became involved with Association for the Trial of Preventative and Curative Treatment in the Cattle Plague by the Homeopathic Method, alongside Edward Hamilton and Alfred Crosby Pope, and overseen by John Winston Spencer Churchill 7th Duke of Marlborough.

George Lennox Moore wrote a detailed report on these trials, including a refutation of the falsities published in The Lancet regarding the homeopathic treatment of the cattle plague, attacking William Coutts Keppel Viscount Bury 7th Earl of Albemarle and accusing him of ‘being completely misinformed on this matter‘, and inventing a trail of misleading mistruths about the situation.

The orthodox statistics of this clinical trial revealed 8640 cases, 8% killed, 77% died and 15% recovered, though John Winston Spencer Churchill 7th Duke of Marlborough subsequently issued the interim homeopathic results claiming up to 50% recovery rates with arsenicum, belladonna, phosphorus, rhus tox and turpentine as the main homeopathic remedies used.

The Times wrote an article wishing the homeopaths success in these homeopathic trials, but they also made a pithy comment that the allopaths would probably rather see all the cattle die than have homeopathy proved successfull.

The final report on the homeopathic trials in the treatment of cattle plague was issued by John Winston Spencer Churchill 7th Duke of Marlborough. The orthodox statistics of this clinical trial revealed 8640 cases, 8% killed, 77% died and 15% recovered, though John Winston Spencer Churchill 7th Duke of Marlborough subsequently issued the interim homeopathic results claiming up to 50% recovery rates with arsenicum, belladonna, phosphorus, rhus tox and turpentine as the main homeopathic remedies used.

Of course, the ‘valuable and so far successful’ results of the homeopathic trials so far outstripped orthodox treatments, the homeopathic trials were immediately postponed by ‘orthodox sources’.

Of interest:

Augustus Leveson Vernon 1836 – 1925, ?son of Henry Charles Vernon, the High Sheriff Staffordshire, was a Patron of Homeopathy,

Augustus Leveson Vernon b. 20/9/1836, d 9/12/1925, m 2/6/1864, Selena Anne (b. 1/2.1842, .9/12/1930) yst dau of Walter Peter Giffard of Chillington. J.P., D.L., High Sheriff Staffs 1899. Seat:- Hilton Park, Wolverhampton. Club:- Carlton. From newspaper cutting (RLV collection): The death took place on Monday at the Dower House, Hilton Park, of Mrs. Selina Anne Vernon, widow of Mr. Augustus Leveson Vernon, D.L., J.P., who died in December 1925, in his ninetieth year.

Mrs. Vernon was the youngest daughter of Mr. W.P. Giffard, of Chillington Hall, near Brewood, and was married to Mr. Vernon in 1864. They settled at Deansfield, Brewood, and remained there until 1886, when Mr. Vernon came into the Hilton Estates and removed to Hilton Park.

Like her husband, Mrs. Vernon was an enthusiastic follower of hounds, and was for many years a conspicuous figure in the field with the Albrighton and S. Staffs. Hunts.

Upon celebration in 1924 of their diamond wedding, Mr. And Mrs. Vernon both took to the saddle and went out with the hounds, whilst Mrs. Vernon, who had commenced her career with the hounds as a girl, boasted that she could beat her husband’s record by 16 years.

For over half a century it was the custom of the Albrighton and S. Staffs. Hounds to meet at Hilton Park in alternate years on the occasion of Mr. Vernon’s birthday, and generous hospitality was dispensed by Mr. and Mrs. Vernon. One of the most interesting hunting souvenirs at Hilton Park is the leather pouch for the hunt-master’s horn used by Mrs. Vernon’s father when he was the master of the Albrighton about ninety years ago.

In addition, there is a fine collection of about a hundred brushes, collected by the late Squire over a period of fifty years, each brush being labeled with the date and circumstances of the killing of the fox with the local hounds.

Mrs. Vernon took a sympathetic interest in the various religious and social activities of her husband, and by her beneficent works in the district gained the love and affection of a wide circle of friends.

The funeral took place at Shareshill Chuchyard on Thursday, when  there was a full congregation in the Parish Church. There followed a list of the mourners etc, amongst whom were Mr. and Mrs. WBB Vernon, Miss Vernon, Miss M Vernon (daughters), Miss D Vernon (grand-daughter).

Another cutting described “the dower house which stands in the shadow of the memorial tower erected to the memory of Admiral Edward Vernon, who captured Porto Bello in 1739. It is notable that RL Vernon was not present: this was the time when he was farming in Kenya.

Obituary for ALV from Staffordshire Paper. DEATH OF Mr. A.L. VERNON, D.L., OF HILTON PARK. The death took place at his residence, Hilton Park, Shareshill, on Wednesday morning of Mr. Augustus Leveson Vernon, D.L., J.P., who had been lying seriously ill for the past two or three weeks.

The deceased gentleman was in his 90th year. A year ago Mr. and Mrs. Vernon celebrated their diamond wedding. One of the last public functions at which Mr. Vernon attended and spoke at the opening ceremony of the new Hilton Main colliery of the Holly Bank Coal Co. Ltd.

Henry Charles Vernon 1805 – 1886 was a High Sheriff of Staffordshire, ?father of Augustus Leveson Vernon, and an active advocate of homeopathy

Henry Charles Vernon lived at Hilton Park, Hilton, Staffordshire,

The first Grand Superintendent of the Province of Staffordshire was Henry Charles Vernon who resided at Hilton Park, Shareshill, near Wolverhampton and was descended from a family with military and naval connections.

One of his ancestors being Admiral Vernon, well known as ‘Grog’ Vernon, who served this country with great distinction and was actively engaged in the Battle of Portobello in 1739.

His father was Henry Charles Edward Vernon, a Crimean veteran and a Major General in the 10th Light Dragoons, who was initiated on the 19th January 1802 in the Lodge of Harmony (now 255) Richmond Surrey when he was a Captain.

It is interesting to note that in 1800 he assumed the surname Graham by Royal Licence on inheriting maternal property, and therefore was initiated as H.C.E. Vernon Graham, as was his son, Henry Charles but in 1838 the family discontinued to use the surname Graham.

Our first Grand Superintendent was born on the 9th January 1805 and died on the 26th February 1886. Apart from his Masonic activities he was a Justice of the Peace, a Deputy Lieutenant and was appointed High Sheriff of Staffordshire in 1867.

He had a second residence in Malvern, Worcestershire which explains his close connections with that Province. The family no longer reside at Hilton Park but it is of some interest that when our present Provincial Grand Master, W. Bro. Stanley Barrington, was looking for likely sites for the Major Wilson Keys Memorial Fund, this house was considered. Unfortunately because of certain restrictions, negotiations could not proceed.

The family at that time owned considerable land and also an interest in coal minerals. In the nearby Church at Shareshill there are plaques of bequests made by the family and a stained glass window as a memorial to H.C. Vernon, the son of the Grand Superintendent who died at the early age of 26.

On the l1th March 1828 he married Katherine, daughter of Richard Bryce Williams, Esq., of Cardiff and it could be that his Masonic interest in Bristol was in some way connected with his in-laws, for he was initiated on the 13th April 1831 in the Royal Sussex Lodge of Hospitality No. 221 (now 187) Bristol, passed on the 11th May 1831 and raised on the 8th May 1833 in the same Lodge.

In 1835 he became a joining member of the Clarence Lodge of Mariners No. 81 Bristo1 and also of the Moira Lodge No. 408 Bristol, occupying the Worshipful Master’s Chair in both Lodges in 1835 and 1836 respectively.

I am indebted to E. Comp. Mickleburgh for an extract from the Minutes of Moira Lodge of the 26th July 1836, which states that the Worshipful Master (Bro. R.B. Callender) informed the Lodge that having been elected Master in the year 1831 and no Brother having since been elected to that office, he could not consistently with the Constitutions remain in the Chair; but this not being the time by the bye-laws for the election of Officers, he thought the brethren could not at present proceed to such an election.

He therefore begged to move that Bro. H.C. Vernon Graham being the W.M. of a Warranted Lodge be requested to take the Chair until the time appointed for the election of a Worshipful Master. This was seconded by a Brother Burroughs and carried unanimously. Brother Graham was immediately conducted into the Chair”.

On the 5th October 1834 he also became a joining member of St. Peter’s Lodge No.607 (now 419) Wolverhampton. On the 3rd April 1848 he also became a joining member of the Lodge of Light, Warwickshire No. 689 (now 468), but had resigned by the end of 1851.

He was appointed Provincial Senior Grand Warden of Staffordshire in 1835, and in 1847 was installed as Deputy Provincial Grand Master of the Province, an office which he held until he resigned in 1853.

In 1848 he was appointed a Senior Grand Warden of the United Grand Lodge of England and two years later, as well as being he Deputy Grand Master of Staffordshire he was installed as the Provincial Grand Master of Worcestershire under Patent dated 20th June 1850 an office he held until 1863.

In Royal Arch Masonry he was exalted on the 5th June 1834 into the Chapter of Charity No. 221 (now 187) Bristol and became a joining member of St. Peter’s Chapter No. 607 (now 419) Wolverhampton in 1846 and of the Sutherland Chapter No. 660 Burslem (now defunct) in 1847.

He was installed as 3rd Principal of the latter Chapter in 1848 and presumably proceeded through the Chairs, that is if that Chapter had not ceased to meet soon afterwards.

He was appointed First Assistant Grand Sojourner in 1848 and in 1849 was designated by Supreme Grand Chapter as the M.E. Grand Superintendent of Staffordshire, a position he held for four years.

When he resigned as Grand Superintendent of Staffordshire in 1853, he was appointed M.E. Grand Superintendent of Worcestershire, a position he held until 1866.

Apart from his interest in the Craft and the Royal Arch he had connections in other Masonic Orders. In the Ancient and Accepted Rite he was Perfected on the 24th of August 1855 in St. Peter and St. Paul Chapter (now No.6) and promoted to the 30° on 31st October 1855, to the 31° on 14th October 1856 to the 32° on the 13th October 1857 and was elected to the 33° in 1860, becoming a Grand Captain General in 1861, a position which he held until 1868.

In the same year he was appointed Grand Secretary General and in 1862 appointed Grand Treasurer General and in 1869 Lieutenant Grand Commander which he resigned in 1871.

In the Knights Templar he was installed into Beauceant Preceptory and on the Consecration of Godefroi de Bouillon Preceptory in 1853 he was installed as its first Preceptor by his brother George Augustus Vernon.

He was appointed Second Great Captain in l854. It is recorded by V. Em. Kt. John Francis Moxon in his history of the Province of Staffordshire and Shropshire of the Religious and Military Order of the Temple, that at the Consecration of Richard de Vernon Preceptory in 1857, Charles Henry Vernon became Provincial Prior or Provincial Grand Commander of Worcestershire, which office he held until 1886.

The first Meeting of the Provincial Grand Chapter of Staffordshire was held on the 21st May 1850 at the Castle Hotel, Newcastle-under-Lyme, Staffordshire under the Banner of the Chapter of Perseverance No. 674. This Hotel which was situated in High Street, Newcastle is now a Supermarket and has been since about 1975, although the facade has been retained as it was a listed building.

A copy of the original Minutes are as follows: The circumstances in which E. Comp. H.C. Vernon was designated as first M.E. Grand Superintendent is not clear but it is assumed that as he was the Deputy Provincial Grand Master of the Province and a very active Mason that he was the obvious choice for that office.

One can only conjecture the reason for holding the Meeting at Newcastle-under-Lyme instead of under the Banner of St. Peter’s Chapter, Wolverhampton which was much nearer to Hilton Park.

There are two explanations, the first one being that in 1849 a Provincial Grand Lodge Meeting was cancelled at Wolverhampton and held at Newcastle-under-Lyme because of the cholera plague which had then struck Wolverhampton and its districts resulting in the death of 1500 and it being thought not wise to hold the Meeting at Wolverhampton.

On the other hand it could be because he was a member of the Sutherland Chapter which met at the Castle Hotel, Newcastle and he preferred to hold the Meeting under the Banner of the Chapter where he had or was occupying one of the Chairs.

Fortunately all the Minute Books since 1850 have been preserved and are in the possession of the Provincial Grand Chapter. The Minutes of the first Meeting are beautifully written but unfortunately, apart from Comp. G.A. Vernon, no initials of the Companions are recorded nor are the numbers of the Chapters. However I am indebted to E. Comp. Hamill for a copy of the Freemasons Quarterly Review for June 1850 which gives a full list of the Officers appointed.

Of interest:

I wonder if this Veron was related? Lieutenant Colonel Bellers of Baston Manor, Abbey Dore, *Pontrilas, Herfordshire is also noted in James John Garth Wilkinson‘s address book in 1895 (Swedenborg Archive Address Book of James John Garth Wilkinson dated 1895), is this Lieutenant Colonel Ernest Vernon Bellers (1856-1927http://www.clement-jones.com/ps05/ps05_135.htm)?

See also http://sueyounghistories.com/archives/2009/06/27/harold-edgar-tyrwhitt-1890-1960/

See also http://sueyounghistories.com/archives/2009/08/27/robert-vernon-heber-percy-1911-%E2%80%93-1987/

James John Garth Wilkinson also has another Vernon in his address book – W H Vernon at 34 Gaisford Street, Kentish Town, and also at 45 South Hill Park, Hampstead (Victorians did tend to move rather frequently) (Swedenborg Archive Address Book of James John Garth Wilkinson dated 1895)

2 thoughts on “William Warren Vernon 1834 – 1919”

  1. Hi Sue,
    In case you don’t already have this reference (I might have missed it), I just thought you might be interested in the fact that William Warren Vernon and his wife were also patrons of a homeopathic hospital in Cannes, under the direction of a Dr Sanders Stephens on 31st October 1876. The peculiarities of this small hospital was that it would only accept two types of patients: Private English patients who could pay “a small pension” and would be lodged in luxurious accommodation, and the poor of Cannes. (Source: El Criterio Médico (Madrid, Spain), [Official journal of the Sociedad Hahnemanniana Matritense], Vol XVII, No. 25 (25th December 1876), p.574.)

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